Entertainment Desk
Set in the ’90s Bengal, Murari M Rakshit’s ‘Reunion’ deals with politics and its impact on students. Nostalgia, too, plays a key role in the narrative.
Speaking about life in the ’90s, Parambrata Chattopadhyay said, “I was in college when we first got exposed to the internet. But it wasn’t as easily available as it is now. The ’90s were so different. I feel the world has changed a bit too quickly post the late ’90s. The difference made in the last 20 years was quite big. The discussions, the world we lived in, the ideas, the chats were very different. Although I enjoy all the amenities that the new world has brought in, I do miss those times. The cassettes, the single screens playing English films for which we’d go together from high school or college — all these make me nostalgic!”
Book fair, too, was a huge attraction for the actor. “I miss the mini and the state-run red buses. Yellow cabs were such a luxury back then! I’ve grown into a man in the new world but spent my boyhood in the ’90s, so I’m very much a ’90s person that way,” Parambrata added.
Raima Sen, too, has fond memories of the ’90s. “I was in college when I got my first mobile phone! Life without social media was fun as well. We’d call friends on landline and sometimes, play pranks on them. That thrill is missing now. There was no intrusion and relationships were stronger,” she said.
The director said emotions used to play a big role during the ’90s. “Relationships were more intense, human values were more important than technology. Life was much simpler,” he recalled. Co-producer Subhajit Rakshit, who’s happy with the audience’s response, said, “MMR Films is here to stay. We’ll offer unique content-based movies in Bengali and other languages.”