English goalkeeper Jordan Pickford saves the tiebreaker shoot of Colombia’s Carlos Bacca to win the match at Otkritie Arena, Moscow on Tuesday. Photo: Collected

England won a World Cup penalty shootout for the first time on a night of high drama in Moscow, overcoming Colombia to secure a quarter-final meeting with Sweden.
Amid a fevered atmosphere inside Spartak Stadium, Eric Dier scored the winning kick after Jordan Pickford’s brilliant save from Carlos Bacca.
Manager Gareth Southgate celebrated with his staff while his players mobbed the heroes Pickford and Dier after their first win at the knockout stage of major tournament since 2006.
Southgate’s side looked to have emerged unscathed from an ill-disciplined match courtesy of Harry Kane’s penalty, only for Colombia’s Yerry Mina to equalise in the closing seconds of stoppage time to send the massed ranks of Colombia fans wild.
The extra 30 minutes could not separate the sides and led to a nerve-shredding finale that has so often been England’s undoing, with a dismal record of just one win in seven shootouts at major tournaments before this.
England looked to be set for more agony when Jordan Henderson’s penalty was saved by David Ospina but Mateus Uribe smashed the following kick on to the crossbar to pave the way for Pickford and Dier to be England’s saviours.
No previous world champions stand between England and the final. The winners of their quarter-final will face either Croatia or hosts Russia for a place in the Moscow showpiece on 15 July.
England’s survived a test of nerve that will prove invaluable as they drive deeper into this World Cup after a night of noise, colour and hostility in Moscow.
Southgate’s side cast off the clouds of dread that have come over England in penalty shootouts in the past, a psychological lift that may yet help them further down the line.
Colombia made their intentions clear from the off. This was going to be a scrap and Jose Pekerman’s side would be the beneficiaries if England were dragged into it.
England lived on the edge in those physical exchanges but the manner in which they survived and came through that test will add an extra layer to the satisfaction.
And within the dogged team performance, individuals once more made their mark.
Everton goalkeeper Pickford received some criticism for his performance against Belgium but was outstanding here, not only saving that Bacca penalty but producing one of the saves of the World Cup from Uribe’s thunderous drive from 30 yards – which cruelly led to the corner that brought Mina’s equaliser.
And Trippier’s measured penalty was another indication of his growing maturity at this level, the Spurs full-back having again performed solidly down England’s right.
Southgate’s one-match-at-a-time mantra has been designed to keep expectations in check as his side have been presented with their best opportunity at a World Cup since they reached the semi-finals of Italia 90.
If he was listening to the England fans who gathered and sang non-stop late into the Moscow night behind the goal in the Spartak Stadium, it may have dawned on him that keeping a lid on expectations is likely to be a losing battle.
England will have taken a lot out of themselves in this physically gruelling and mentally taxing last-16 game and they now face the well-organised and resilient Swedes.
If they can overcome Sweden, the possibility of a semi-final meeting with Russia or Croatia comes into view.
England found a way to win here that has often eluded them, digging deep in the process – and they will have headed back to their Zelenogorsk training HQ in soaring spirits.
There is work to do, though, and this was not a flawless performance by any means, but England and Southgate have now regained the momentum they lost in their group-stage loss to Belgium and can look to build on that.
American referee Mike Geiger’s failure to clamp down on early misdemeanours led to him losing control of a game that Colombia seemed determined to turn into a battle.
Instead of imposing his authority on proceedings with firm decision-making, he instead indulged in lengthy discussion with players from both sides on numerous occasions.
It lead to Colombia, in particular, pushing him to the edge – although England were not total innocents, with both Henderson and Harry Maguire leaving themselves open to accusations of being over-theatrical and many others sailing close to the wind.
This would have been a tough night for any referee, with players clearly failing to respect his decisions, and making no attempt to make the official’s life easier, but it is to be hoped officials with a greater sense of authority are handed the huge games that remain here in Russia. Man of the match is Harry Kane of England.